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Coronavirus test: How long does it take and when will I know my COVID-19 results? – CNET

It may take over a week to get your coronavirus test results back.

James Martin/CNET

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

Coronavirus test kits continue to be limited in most states throughout the country. But more tests — and more types of testing — are slowly becoming available. The challenge is that testing is uneven. From who can get a COVID-19 test to the difficulty of finding a testing site in your area and even how long the test results take to come in, many of us still have plenty of questions.

The shortage of COVID-19 test kits and personal protective equipment in areas where there’s a surge in demand for testing presents one problem. Another issue discovered last month was the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s labs were found to be contaminated with the coronavirus, which delayed distribution of test kits.

In most cases, your doctor should let you know a time frame for getting your coronavirus results back, but that can vary from hours to even a week. Here’s what we know about how long it takes to get tested and how to find out your results.

coronavirus-testing-hayward-ca-medical-doctors-hospital-5939coronavirus-testing-hayward-ca-medical-doctors-hospital-5939

There are drive-through locations for coronavirus testing.

James Martin/CNET

When can I get a COVID-19 test?

In order to be tested for coronavirus, you’ll likely need to have a doctor’s order and make an appointment with a testing facility.

However, if you’re a high-risk patient or experiencing severe symptoms, like trouble breathing, you should seek medical attention immediately. Call your doctor for a referral to a testing clinic in your area. 

What is the COVID-19 test like?

When you go to get tested for coronavirus, you’ll either be directed to a clinic or a drive-through testing site. If you’re waiting in a medical facility, it’s recommended by the CDC that you wear a face covering to prevent spreading the virus to others.

The most common type of testing for COVID-19 today is a nose swab test that’s similar to testing for other flu viruses (though antibody blood tests are on the horizon). The doctor will swab the inside of your nose for several seconds with a long, single-use tool that looks like a giant Q-Tip and reaches the upper part of the throat. The test is then sealed and sent to a laboratory to determine if you have COVID-19.

Read more: Need a pulse oximeter? These models are in stock starting at $24  

When will I get my results?

In theory, the lab will be able to determine if you’ve acquired the coronavirus within hours. But depending on where you live, it can take anywhere up to a week or more to get your test results back. It also depends on how many tests have been administered in your location. For example, some facilities, like in New York, are overwhelmed by the number of people getting tested — therefore, the waiting period may be longer.

Other states, like California, are experiencing a backlog of test results due to the lack of kits at their facilities. Norton Healthcare says test results are taking longer than anticipated because of increased testing nationwide.

The Cleveland Clinic in Ohio says that patients in the hospital who are very ill or high-risk typically receive their results within 24 hours. However, patients who are tested at a drive-through facility get their results back within five to 10 days.

Once your results are available, your doctor will contact you to let you know if you’ve tested positive or negative for the coronavirus. 

Now playing: Watch this: High-tech tools to detect coronavirus


1:23

What if I test positive for the coronavirus?

If the results come back that you’ve been infected with COVID-19, make sure to let everyone you’ve come in close contact with in the last two weeks know. Ask your doctor for the next steps and continue to isolate yourself at home. We have some guidelines for taking care of yourself if you’re infected with the virus.

The CDC says you can leave the house again once you’ve had no fever for at least 72 hours (without medicine), symptoms like coughing have improved and at least seven days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.

For more information on coronavirus testing, here’s how to find a coronavirus testing site near you and check wait times, who qualifies for COVID-19 testing and why you can’t use a coronavirus home testing kit yet.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

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Automated Independent Grocer Checkouts – Homeland Has Implemented the Toshiba Self-Checkout System 7 (TrendHunter.com)

Automated Independent Grocer Checkouts – Homeland Has Implemented the Toshiba Self-Checkout System 7 (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) Independent grocery store chain Homeland has announced that it will be deploying the Toshiba Self-Checkout System 7 throughout its stores in order to accelerate the number of customers that can pay…
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(TrendHunter.com) Independent grocery store chain Homeland has announced that it will be deploying the Toshiba Self-Checkout System 7 throughout its stores in order to accelerate the number of customers that can pay…
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Magnetic Port Expansion Hubs – The HyperDrive DUO USB-C Hub is Designed for the MacBook Pro (TrendHunter.com)

Magnetic Port Expansion Hubs – The HyperDrive DUO USB-C Hub is Designed for the MacBook Pro (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) The MacBook Pro is an essential tool for many prosumers out there but is limited in terms of port variety, so the HyperDrive DUO USB-C Hub has been unveiled as the brands latest solution that will…
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(TrendHunter.com) The MacBook Pro is an essential tool for many prosumers out there but is limited in terms of port variety, so the HyperDrive DUO USB-C Hub has been unveiled as the brands latest solution that will…
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Stop waiting in line at the post office to ship a package. Do this smart trick instead – CNET

15-meal-cooking-at-home-roku-tv-movie-night-alone-slippers-wine-remote-control-streaming-services-coronavirus-cnet

Skip the post office lines and drop your packages in a drop box.

Sarah Tew/CNET

No one wants to wait in a long line at the post office when shipping multiple packages, especially if they’re heavy. Not to mention it’s hard to maintain social distancing in a small, cramped room while you wait for the clerk to call you to the counter, and wearing a face mask can start to get uncomfortable. Fortunately, you can skip the line at the post office if you have the right supplies.

If you’re using your own box, you’ll need to know the exact weight of the package you’re sending. Here’s a better way. USPS offers a flat-rate service that lets you order free boxes and ship packages up to 70 pounds. Shipping prices start at $7.50, depending on the package size. To avoid having to tape it at the post office, most people can choose the medium side-load box option.

Once you’ve got the item boxed up, you’ll need to print a prepaid shipping label from USPS. To do so, log in to your USPS account, navigate to Click N Ship and purchase your shipping label. You can then print the label at home and tape it to your box.

Read more: Best printers for 2020

Now playing: Watch this: Best practices for safe shopping, delivery and takeout…


9:45

Once you’re ready to ship the item, you can either request a pickup or drop the package in a USPS collection box. The boxes are generally located at the post office, but can also be found outside at other locations, such as grocery stores, other types of stores and libraries. To find the one closest to you, visit the Find Locations page on the USPS site and filter by Collection Boxes.

While you won’t get a receipt using this shipping method, you can still track your package on the USPS site. The tracking number will be on the bottom of your USPS tracking label and in your confirmation email.

You know how to ship packages without going inside the post office now, but what about packages left at your door? Here’s what to know about coronavirus and your packages and how to safely order food delivery, takeout and groceries during the coronavirus quarantine.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

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Virtual Reality Art Galleries – Space Popular Creates the ‘AA Earth Gallery’ in the Digital Space (TrendHunter.com)

Virtual Reality Art Galleries – Space Popular Creates the ‘AA Earth Gallery’ in the Digital Space (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) Many physical events are pivoting to the digital amid the COVID-19 pandemic and this virtual reality art gallery that was launched for the Architectural Association is a prime example. Orchestrated…
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(TrendHunter.com) Many physical events are pivoting to the digital amid the COVID-19 pandemic and this virtual reality art gallery that was launched for the Architectural Association is a prime example. Orchestrated…
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Family-Focused Group Video Calls – Google Duo Added a New ‘Family Mode’ Along with Fun Features (TrendHunter.com)

Family-Focused Group Video Calls – Google Duo Added a New ‘Family Mode’ Along with Fun Features (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) Google recently added a new ‘family mode’ to Google Dou, in order to better facilitate group calls. The new ‘family mode’ brings a number of features to Google Dou, including…
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(TrendHunter.com) Google recently added a new ‘family mode’ to Google Dou, in order to better facilitate group calls. The new ‘family mode’ brings a number of features to Google Dou, including…
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These 8 kitchen tools you’ll use every day cost less than $20 apiece – CNET

 51-meal-cooking-at-home-roku-tv-movie-night-alone-slippers-wine-remote-control-streaming-services-coronavirus-cnet

A cheap kitchen tool can help keep your wine glass intact in the dishwasher.

Sarah Tew/CNET

My kitchen is filled with workhorses that I take for granted: the wooden cutting board, balloon whisk, measuring cups, microplane and razor-sharp knives. But as I’m spending even more time cooking at home during quarantine and lockdown, I’m coming to appreciate all the smaller extras that I don’t strictly need but which make my cooking life easier.

After singing their praises to family and friends, I thought I’d share them with you. These are all products I actually own and use in real life. They’re inexpensive to buy, versatile, easy to clean and simple to incorporate into your cooking routine. Here are the tools I never want to be without, and how they make the act of cooking more enjoyable.

Xujia via Amazon

The wide, saucer-shaped bowl, long handle and pleasant weight make these beautiful spoons perfect for almost everything — eating soup, curries, rice dishes, spooning yogurt out of the tub, spooning anything out of any tub, really. 

My Korean friend called them “jjigae spoons” to refer to the right utensil for eating a category of stew. In my family, they’re known as “life-changing spoons,” which is how I first convinced my family to adopt them. It’s what we still call them today. E.g., “Can you please set the table with the life-changing spoons?” I hardly ever use “regular” spoons anymore, unless all the jjigae spoons are dirty and I don’t feel like washing one. 

You can buy long-handled spoons online or in many Asian markets. My personal preference is to get a set with round handles, not the thin kind with the flat ends. Prices vary, but they’re not expensive either way — say $16 for a pack of 5 good quality spoons, or even $15 for a pack of 8.

Tovolo

Bench scrapers, also known as pastry or dough scrapers or cutters, are typically used to pry dough off a work surface, but I use mine multiple times a day for either scraping or lifting items from my cutting board to a pan or bowl. I used to use the side of whichever knife I had in my hand, but this tool shovels more diced onions at a time and is safer anyway. 

I’ve also used straight-sided bench scrapers, but the offset design is much easier for sliding under a pile of chopped food. It’s equally adept at its intended purpose of working with bread and pastry dough. This Tovolo bench scraper is the one I use and costs around $10.

Jessica Dolcourt/CNET

My friend bought a fancy new dishwasher with built-in wine holders and gave me three purple silicone tubes that help keep your wine glasses safe in the machine. “Here, you like wine,” she said. “You should use these.”

She was right. They may look derpy, but they’ve probably saved my wine glasses more than once. You fit one grippy end around your overturned stemware (as pictured) and slide the other end, a hollow tube, over a peg on the bottom rack of your dishwasher. A wire that runs two-thirds the length of the attachment supplies structure. 

If a glass feels extra wobbly in the center of the bottom rack, I’ve been known to clip on two of these silicone holders for extra stability, one on either side. I used to hand-wash my wine glasses and still managed to break one here or there. Not anymore. It costs about $12 for a set of eight. I’ve run them in the dishwasher on a weekly basis for almost two years.

Lifver Home via Amazon

Small bowls are hardly interesting or new, and I have plenty of them, especially fluted and ribbed ramekins. But these wonderful dip bowls, specifically this design, have made cooking and serving food more of a delight. I just love them. They’re useful enough for daily prep and pretty enough to serve on. 

You can mound a surprising amount of food in the hollow, like lemon zest, wasabi or even grated cheese. They cost $18 for a set of eight 3-ounce bowls.

Here’s how I use them:

  • Spoon rest
  • Used tea bag holder
  • Salt piggy
  • Egg holder
  • Prep bowl for ingredients like garlic, shallots, ginger
  • Prep bowl for blending spices (the mix flows into the pan really easily, without getting stuck in creases)
  • Garnish server
  • Server for individual desserts, like squares of chocolate, a brownie or a tiny scoop of ice cream
  • Sugar caddy for after-dinner coffee or tea
  • Ring valet (especially when taking off to work with slimy or sticky food)

Lodge via Amazon

I had never heard of a pan or pot scraper until my colleague Rich Brown sang its praises. I have an elaborate and finely-tuned method for steaming and scraping off stuck-on crud from pots, pans and bakeware. But I started getting a lot of time back once I began using this $5 tool — or $8 for two.

It fits into your palm and easily scrapes away gunk with its flat and curved edges, which can also better reach into corners. Still expect a little sponge work, but mostly to wipe away loosened and leftover stuff. I was amazed with how my Lodge pot scraper obliterates the scum that builds up in a ring around the pan, say the leftovers of reduced marinara. 

It cuts through residue faster and more efficiently than a hard plastic spatula and it won’t gunk up the scrubby side of a sponge with cheese, egg or starchy buildup. I recommend keeping it visible on your sink, near your sponges and dish soap. I initially put it into a drawer and forgot about it, but now it’s top of mind. 

Prep Solutions via Amazon

My dad endearingly referred to these as “rubber fingers.” This set of two — one with a pointy end (pictured) and one that looks more like a paddle, cost me $4 and are awesome for scraping, scooping and pushing down all types of food. Think the last little bit of something gooey from the jar, or getting every little bit of beaten egg out of a small bowl. I still use full-size spatulas for large work bowls, pots and pans, but these nonstick minis work better than spoons or my finger and fit really well into drawer dividers. They’re machine washable, too.

Jessica Dolcourt/CNET

Elegantly draining pasta, reaching for items on the top shelf, juicing lemons and even cleaning window blinds. A pair of 9-inch or 12-inch silicone-tipped tongs costs about $15 and has become a trusty kitchen companion that does far more than just flip browning vegetables and meat. Here are seven clever uses for kitchen tongs.

Endurance via Amazon

I love a small saucepan for so many reasons, including frying perfectly round eggs one at a time and reducing broth and sauces. Melting butter and making modest quantities of caramel or hot milk and cream are also great in an itty-bitty pan, especially if you’re trying to keep a small amount of liquid from evaporating too quickly.

I bought a “cup measuring pan” that’s a lot like this one, with a long handle, and I like it, though it’s not as thick as some of my other kitchen pots. I’d also happily consider a butter melting pot for butter, sauces, warming milk and boiling single eggs, but I currently use a tiny milk frothing jug for that, intended for espresso. Whichever pan you get should cost between $15 and $25, tops. Mine was about $15. 

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Two-in-One Productivity Tablets – The Microsoft Surface Go 2 Meets the Needs of Enterprise Users (TrendHunter.com)

Two-in-One Productivity Tablets – The Microsoft Surface Go 2 Meets the Needs of Enterprise Users (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) The Microsoft Surface Go 2 is an enterprise-ready solution that will also meet the needs of prosumers seeking out a way to perform an array of digital tasks for leisure or pleasure purposes. The…
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(TrendHunter.com) The Microsoft Surface Go 2 is an enterprise-ready solution that will also meet the needs of prosumers seeking out a way to perform an array of digital tasks for leisure or pleasure purposes. The…
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Durable Digital Professional Laptops – The HP mt22 Mobile Thin Client is Security-Focused (TrendHunter.com)

Durable Digital Professional Laptops – The HP mt22 Mobile Thin Client is Security-Focused (TrendHunter.com)

(TrendHunter.com) The HP mt22 Mobile Thin Client laptop is a versatile computing solution for professionals that will enable them to maintain an enhanced workflow without losing sight of security or even hardware…
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(TrendHunter.com) The HP mt22 Mobile Thin Client laptop is a versatile computing solution for professionals that will enable them to maintain an enhanced workflow without losing sight of security or even hardware…
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8 must-have kitchen tools under $20, and how to use them – CNET

01-cooking-food-at-home-in-isolation-coronavirus
Sarah Tew/CNET

Cooking more during quarantine and lockdown? So am I. Like so many of you, I’m embracing cooking as a fulfilling at-home project — and one with the added bonus of filling my belly and stepping up my technique. 

The parade of meals has also given me a newfound appreciation for the kitchen tools I already have and love, items beyond the more obvious wooden spoon, measuring cups and microplane. These are all products I actually own and use in real life. They’re inexpensive to buy, versatile and easy to incorporate into your cooking routine. 

Here are the tools I never want to be without, and how they make my kitchen better.

Xujia via Amazon

The wide, saucer-shaped bowl, long handle and pleasant weight make these beautiful long-handled spoons perfect for almost everything — eating soup, curries, rice dishes, spooning yogurt out of the tub, spooning anything out of any tub, really. 

My Korean friend called them “jjigae spoons” to refer to the right utensil for eating a category of stew. In my family, they’re known as “life-changing spoons,” which is how I first convinced my family to adopt them. It’s what we still call them today. E.g., “Can you please set the table with the life-changing spoons?” I hardly ever use “regular” spoons anymore, unless all the jjigae spoons are dirty and I don’t feel like washing one. 

You can buy long-handled spoons online or in many Asian markets. My personal preference is to get a set with round handles, not the thin kind with the flat ends. Prices vary, but they’re not expensive either way — say $16 for a pack of 5 good quality spoons.

Tovolo

Bench scrapers, also known as pastry or dough scrapers or cutters, are typically used to pry dough off a work surface, but I use mine multiple times a day for either scraping or lifting items from my cutting board to a pan or bowl. I used to use the side of whichever knife I had in my hand, but this tool shovels more diced onions at a time and is safer anyway. 

I’ve also used straight-sided bench scrapers, but the offset design is much easier for sliding under a pile of chopped food. It’s equally adept at its intended purpose of working with bread and pastry dough. This Tovolo bench scraper is the one I use and costs around $10.

Jessica Dolcourt/CNET

My friend bought a fancy new dishwasher with built-in wine holders and gave me three purple silicone tubes that help keep your wine glasses safe in the machine. “Here, you like wine,” she said. “You should use these.”

She was right. They may look derpy, but they’ve probably saved my wine glasses more than once. You fit one grippy end around your upturned stemware and slide the other end, a hollow tube, over a peg on the bottom rack of your dishwasher. A wire that runs two-thirds the length of the attachment supplies structure. 

If a glass feels extra wobbly in the center of the bottom rack, I’ve been known to clip on two of these silicone holders for extra stability, one on either side. I used to hand-wash my wine glasses and still managed to break one here or there. Not anymore. It costs about $12 for a set of eight. I’ve run them in the dishwasher on a weekly basis for almost two years.

Lifver Home via Amazon

Small bowls are hardly interesting or new, and I have plenty of them, especially fluted and ribbed ramekins. But these wonderful dip bowls, specifically this design, have made cooking and serving food more of a delight. I just love them. They’re useful enough for daily prep and pretty enough to serve on. 

You can mount a surprising amount of food in the hollow, like lemon zest, wasabi or even finely grated cheese. They cost $18 for a set of eight 3-ounce bowls.

Here’s how I use them:

  • Spoon rest
  • Used tea bag holder
  • Salt piggy
  • Egg holder
  • Prep bowl for small things like garlic, shallots, ginger
  • Prep bowl for small quantities of spice blend (it flows into the pan really easily, without residue)
  • Garnish server
  • Server for individual desserts, like squares of chocolate, a brownie or a tiny scoop of ice cream
  • Sugar for after-dinner coffee or tea
  • Ring valet (especially when taking off to work with slimy or sticky food)

Rich Brown/CNET

I had never heard of a pan or pot scraper until my colleague Rich Brown sang its praises. I have an elaborate and finely-tuned method for steaming and scraping off stuck-on crud from pots, pans and bakeware. But I started getting a lot of time back once I began using this $5 tool — or $8 for two.

It fits into your palm and easily scrapes away gunk with its flat and curved edges, which can also better reach into corners. Still expect a little sponge work, but mostly to wipe away loosened and leftover stuff. I was amazed with how my Lodge pot scraper obliterates the scum that builds up in a ring around the pan, say the leftovers of reduced marinara. 

It cuts through residue faster and more efficiently than a hard plastic spatula and it won’t gunk up the scrubby side of a sponge with cheese, egg or starchy buildup. I recommend keeping it visible on your sink, near your sponges and dish soap. I initially put it into a drawer and forgot about it, but now it’s top of mind. 

Endurance via Amazon

I love a small saucepan for so many reasons, including frying perfectly round eggs one at a time and reducing broth and sauces. Melting butter and making small quantities of caramel or hot milk and cream are also great in an itty-bitty pan, especially if you’re trying to keep a small amount of liquid from evaporating too quickly.

I bought a “cup measuring pan” that’s a lot like this one, with a long handle, and I like it, though it’s not as thick as some of my other kitchen pots. I’d also happily consider a butter melting pot for butter, sauces, warming milk and boiling single eggs, but I currently use a tiny milk frothing jug for that, intended for espresso. Whichever pan you get should cost between $15 and $25, and needs to be all-metal (unless you want melted plastic on your stovetop). 

Jessica Dolcourt/CNET

Elegantly draining pasta, reaching for items on the top shelf, juicing lemons and even cleaning window blinds. A pair of 9-inch or 12-inch silicone-tipped tongs costs about $15 and has become a trusty kitchen companion that does far more than just flip browning vegetables and meat.

Prep Solutions via Amazon

My dad endearingly referred to these as “rubber fingers.” This set of two — one with a pointy end (pictured) and one that looks more like a subtle scoop, cost me $4 and are awesome for scraping, scooping and pushing down all types of food. Think the last little bit of something gooey from the jar, or getting every little bit of beaten egg out of a small bowl. I still use larger spatulas for larger pots and pans, but these nonstick minis are great and fit really well into drawer dividers. They’re machine washable, too.